Good Job: Another chair through the wall

In these trying times, I feel as if we need to inject some fun in our lives, whether it be through positive mediums like hiking, fishing, surfing, etc. or through less helpful mediums like binge-watching Gotham or challenging yourself to drink a 12 pack of Redbull at four in the morning. While there are good ways to have fun, Good Job defies all attempts to put it in a box. I and roommates simultaneously poked fun, grit our teeth at the tedious level design, padded out objectives, and terrible music. At the same time, we couldn’t put it down because we were keeled over laughing half the time.

You’re a CEO’s son, who has been hired at his dad’s company and has to work his way up the corporate ladder by doing four things from each floor and moving on to the next.

It’s a cartoonish game for sure, which doesn’t let the laws of physics, gravity, or common sense stop you from shooting office workers in chairs through a wall because you connected a power outlet to a plug and turned it into a ballista -Esque weapon.

There are two different paths through this game: single player, or multiplayer which are basically two other games with 2 different review scores.

Single-player is a game I straight up don’t recommend. The game’s puzzles aren’t bad, but they lack the energy needed to keep the player going. Levels tend to be huge and require constant backtracking to find components and switches. I would often fail to find a puzzle component and wander around and get it by chance, which kills the pacing of the game. The puzzles overall are very barebones, and I never got stuck on any one level due to them being so straightforward.

Multiplayer, on the other hand, is an entirely different experience. I convinced my roommates to give it a go with me, and that’s when I started to have a lot of fun. If your like me and crammed in an apartment with four other roommates, then this game is gold. The physics make it so there’s always fun to be had, whether using a gardening hose to fly over a flower bed or using a crane I nicknamed “The Hand of God” to pick up my roommate in a forklift as he’s trying to complete a puzzle and proclaiming that he’s been chosen for a “higher purpose” (sorry Jesse. The fact that there are two players helps negate the massive level design, and allows the tedious fetch quests to be slightly less dull.

Don’t get me wrong though, there are still a lot of issues, and the hilarious physics engine is a double-edged sword. The forklift levels alone were enough to make me want to shove a fork into an electrical socket. But overall, the physics made it fun, and me and my roommates took a break from all the stress from school and laughed as I flew around the stage on a gardening hose, or me and my roommate Jason tried to enforce a blockade of inflatable dolphins and beach balls in the lazy river to pull them out. The worst levels are the find the workers, which were tedious regardless of how many people were playing, as you have to wander around for upwards of 15 minutes. 

The level design is not helped by the camera positioning, as it tends to obscure essential buttons and switches. I would be remised if I forgot about the most painful aspect of the camera though: the split-screen view. When two characters walk away from each other, the camera is cut in half to allow each person a view of their character. Normal enough right?

Wrong. For some reason the angle and view of the screen tilts depending on the position of the players, to demonstrate where they are. So for example, If I was close to the left side of the map and my friend at the right, the line would be vertical, with my view on the left and his on the right, but then I move to the top, now the view spins wildly to angle the camera line at a diagonal slant. It’s a bit hard to put into words, but let’s just say its seizure inducing after a few minutes. I actually got motion sickness from how fast and blurry the camera got, which showcases just how important a good camera system is with these types of games.

Regardless, the game gains a considerable boost in enjoyment once a second player is added. I’d recommend this game to people who live with multiple people, as the game becomes a lot more entertaining when you have friends cracking jokes or offering advice. I would recommend it as a party game to play with friends, or with a girlfriend/ boyfriend if your both looking for a lighthearted, often funny fun. However, its worthless as a single player experience, and if you get motion sick easily, you might want to sit this one out.

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